Title: Unlocking the Potential of the UK-Australian Digital Market post-Brexit

Theme: Digital Media Law and Society

Manchester Law School, The University of Manchester, UK

 

As we enter the second phase of Brexit, where the UK is negotiating its future relationships with both the EU and third countries (including Australia), this conference will explore the available opportunities and challenges for the digital market in the post-Brexit era.

As such, the organisers welcome the submission of abstracts on the following conference themes:

1. Freedom of speech and data privacy and security: 

How are freedom of speech and data privacy and security in cyberspace impacted by Brexit and how can they be protected and/or regulated in this context? What are the opportunities and challenges for the UK to choose a suitable and effective regulatory model for protecting and balancing freedom of speech and data privacy and security in cyberspace in the context of its future trade or data transfer arrangements with AUS and the EU? What will be the impact of the UK seeking regulatory divergence from, or regulatory alignment with, or replication of AUS or EU regulation, or mutual recognition or equivalence agreements with AUS and/or the EU? What are the opportunities or challenges for the UK to exert or retain influence on AUS or EU standards?

2. Digital media services and networks:

 How are cross-border trade and competition in digital (audiovisual media and information society) services and networks impacted by Brexit and how can they be facilitated and/or regulated in this context? What are the opportunities and challenges for the UK to choose a suitable and effective regulatory model for trade, competition and technological changes in digital services and communications networks (including sports broadcasting, live streaming, online platforms, content blocking) in the context of its future trade relationships with AUS and the EU? What will be the impact of the UK seeking regulatory divergence from, or regulatory alignment with, or replication of AUS or EU regulation, or mutual recognition or equivalence agreements with the US and/or the EU? What are the opportunities or challenges for the UK to exert or retain influence on AUS or EU standards?

3. Artificial Intelligence: 

How is artificial intelligence impacted by Brexit and how can it be regulated in this context? What are the opportunities and challenges for the UK to choose a suitable and effective regulatory model for addressing the legal, ethical, technological and socio-economic impacts of artificial intelligence in the context of future trade relationships with AUS and the EU? What will be the impact of the UK seeking regulatory divergence from, or regulatory alignment with, or replication of AUS or EU regulation, or mutual recognition or equivalence agreements with AUS and/or the EU? What are the opportunities or challenges for the UK to exert or retain influence on AUS or EU standards?

4. Intellectual property: 

How are IP rights relating to cyberspace and the digital market impacted by Brexit and how could any potential negative impacts be mitigated? What are the opportunities and challenges for the UK to choose a suitable and effective model for the protection and enforcement of cyberspace and digital market-related IP rights in the context of its future trade relationships with AUS and the EU? How can market access and the country of origin and mutual recognition principles be reconciled with the territoriality principle that is inherent in IP rights? How can exhaustion of IP rights (which is not globally applicable outside the EU) be regulated?

5. Investment in innovation: 

What will be the impact of Brexit on investment in innovation in the UK-AUS digital market? How will the regulation of trade and competition in digital media services and networks, freedom of speech and data privacy/security in cyberspace, artificial intelligence and intellectual property impact on investment in innovation in the digital market? What are the opportunities and challenges for the UK to promote and facilitate inward/outward investment in this sector? What are the opportunities and challenges for the UK to choose suitable and effective models or standards of investment liberalisation and investment protection, and mechanisms for investment dispute resolution in the context of its future trade relationships with AUS and the EU?

 

Submission Guidelines and Timetable

To submit an abstract, please send an email to nicolette.butler@manchester.ac.uk attaching an abstract of 300 words.

  • 20 April 2020 – Closing date for the submission of abstracts
  • 1 May 2020 – Applicants will be informed of the results of the selection process
  • 11-12 June 2020 – Conference
  • October 2020 – Full papers will be requested for consideration for publication in an edited collection.